I made a somewhat cryptic tweet a little while ago about how I spent a crazy-long period of time researching what was, I believed, the next-big-thing in DNS resolution for IPv6 (or so my 2002 edition of “IPv6 Essentials” told me).  I could not work out why I saw nothing about A6 records in any of the excellent Hurricane Electric IPv6 material or in any other documentation I came across.

The answer should have been obvious: DNS A6 records (and the corresponding DNAME records) never caught on.  RFC 3363 recommended that the RFC that defined A6 and DNAME (RFC 2874) be moved back into Experimental status.  If I hadn’t been using an old edition of the IPv6 book, I might never have even known the existence of A6 and not have wasted any time.

In my previous post on IPv6 I theorised that we are in the early-adoption phase of IPv6 where things aren’t quite baked, and yet now I’ve picked up a 9 year old text on the topic and acted all surprised when it got something wrong.  It was a bit stupid of me; had I bought a book about IPv4 in 1976, might it have been similarly out of date in 1985?

As always though I’m richer for the experience!  Or so I thought…  Like many, I’m becoming increasingly time-poor.  When I bought a book on IPv6 some years ago I thought I was making an investment, but it turned out that my investment actually lost for me in several ways:

  1. The book took up physical space in my bookshelf for all that time I wasn’t using it
  2. I didn’t actually use the information at the time I acquired it
  3. The time I could have got value from it was wasted by it idly sitting on the shelf
  4. Once I did try to use it, it actually cost me time rather than saved time

I came to think about the other books on my shelf.  It’s pretty easy to recognise that a book that proclaims to be up-to-date because it “Now covers Red Hat 5.2!” will be anything but.  Also, from the preface of a Perl programming book that says “this was written about Perl 5.8, but it should apply to 5.10 as well” I’ll be forewarned that things will be fairly applicable to 5.12 but maybe not to Perl 6 when it’s out.

Technology usually has a somewhat abbreviated lifespan, so therefore the corresponding documentation will have a lifespan correspondingly short…  Here, however, is an example of a technology that will have a far greater lifespan (we hope) than much of the documentation that currently exists around it.  I emphasise “currently exists”, because it won’t always be that way: IPv4 was pretty well-baked by the time I had anything to do with it, so I could have bought a book on IPv4 with next to no concern that it was going to lead me astray (indeed, I bought W. Rich Stevens’ TCP/IP programming texts during the 1990s, and still use them to this day).  I keep forgetting that I’m on a completely different point of the IPv6 adoption curve, and the “experts” are learning along with me.

So, a new tech library plan then:

  • Reduce dependence on physical books (okay, this one is already a work-in-progress for me) — they don’t come with you on your travels as easily, and (more important in this context) they’re harder to keep up to date.
  • Before regarding the book on the shelf as authoritative, check its publication date.  If it’s more than three years old, depending on the subject matter it might be out of date.  Check if there’s a new edition available, and consider updating.  If there’s no new edition, check for recent reviews (Amazon, etc).  Someone who just bought it last month might have posted an opinion on its currency.
  • If you have to buy a paper book, don’t buy a book on any technology that is a moving target.  On the same shelf as my copy of “IPv6 Essentials” there is a book entitled “Practical VoIP Using VOCAL”.  I never even installed VOCAL, and I’m sure many current VoIP practitioners never heard of it.  (Side note: I think it’s strange that I bought that book, and a Cisco one, but still to this day have never owned a book on Asterisk.  Maybe I have some kind of inability to pick the right nascent-technology book to buy.)
  • Use bookmarking technology more! I have a Delicious account, and I went through a phase of bookmarking everything there.  I realise now that, if I was a bit more disciplined, I could actually use it (or a system like it, depending on what Yahoo! does to it) as my own personal index to the biggest tech library in existence: the Internet.

That first point is harder than it sounds (especially for someone like me who has a couple of books on his shelf with his name on the cover).  My Rich Stevens books are littered with sticky-note bookmarks for when I flick to-and-fro between different programming examples.  Electronic readers are still not there when it comes to the “handy-hints-I-keep-on-my-lap-while-coding” aspect of book ownership.

I have a Sony Reader which I purchased with the intent of making it my mobile tech library.  It’s just not that great for tech documents though, since it doesn’t render diagrams and illustrations well (it also isn’t ideal for PDFs, especially in A4 ratio).  This may change as publishers of tech docs start releasing more titles on e-reader formats like ePub.  The iPad is working much better for tech library tasks; I’m using an app called GoodReader which renders PDFs (especially RedBooks!) quite well and has good browsing and syncing capability as well.

More on these topics later, I’m sure!

Update: I omitted another option in my “tech library plan” — since IPv6 Essentials is an O’Reilly book, I could have registered with their site to get offers on updating to new editions.  Had I done so, the events of this post might not have happened!  Now that I’ve registered my books with O’Reilly, I’m getting offers of 40% off new paper editions and 50% off e-book editions.  Also, in line with my reduce-paper-book-dependence policy, I can “upgrade” any of the titles I own in paper to e-book for US$4.99.  If you haven’t already, I encourage anyone who has O’Reilly books that they rely on as part of their tech library to register them at members.oreilly.com.  (This is an unsolicited endorsement from a happy customer, nothing more!)