I have settled into a somewhat sedentary lifestyle.  My partner tries valiantly to get me involved in her personal training sessions, but I have a lot of inertia.  I know that I need to do something about being more active and increasing my fitness level, but have struggled to find a motivator.

While in Europe I succumbed to a bit of techno-craziness and bought a Fitbit One.  (The craziness wasn’t buying a Fitbit, it was where I bought it—the Apple Store in the Odysseum in Montpellier—and the resulting price I paid compared to if I’d waited and bought it at home, even from an Apple Store.)  I was enjoying the novelty of tracking activity, counting steps and calories, entering water consumption, and monitoring sleep.  I wore it almost constantly through France, in Amsterdam, and on the way back to Australia, thinking I might have finally found a way to motivate myself to exercise—that’s right: the path to a healthier life through good-old 21st century gamification!

I drove up to Brisbane a week ago for lunch with some work colleagues before picking up my kids; of course, the Fitbit was with me all the way.  The only problem was, my leather belt is too thick for the Fitbit’s clip so I instead clipped it into the coin pocket of my jeans.  It’s not so secure, and the Fitbit slid back and forth along the rim of the pocket, but I figured the seam along the edge of the pocket was thick enough to prevent the Fitbit from coming loose.

Almost over the jet-lag from coming back from Europe, I prepared for bed that evening looking forward to wearing the Fitbit to monitor my sleep—only the Fitbit was nowhere to be found.  Not on the jeans, not anywhere visible.  I decided that my method of clipping the Fitbit into the coin pocket was not so secure after all, and it had come loose during the day.

The next day I did the usual “retrace your steps, check behind the couch, blah blah” routine but still came up blank.  During Sunday however, for some reason I decided to start up the Fitbit app on my phone… and was rewarded with a message telling me it was “Syncing”!  I looked around where I was sitting, but still couldn’t find it.  By this time I had convinced myself it really was gone, and the sync message was the app on the phone syncing with the web site.

It got the better of me again today however.  I started the app again, and again was told it was “Syncing”.  I went to the “Devices” list, and sure enough beside my One it said it had synced just then.  Knowing that it had been over a week since I had last seen it, and that the battery was good but it wouldn’t last forever, I decided to pull out all the stops to locate it.

The BTLExplorer screen as it detects my Fitbit One.

The BTLExplorer screen as it detects my Fitbit One.

I figured there had to be an app similar to those I’d seen for scanning Wi-Fi and Bonjour but for Bluetooth, but searching for “bluetooth locator”, “bluetooth search”, and so on led to nothing helpful—there is a growing number of apps that help you search for headsets or objects to which you’ve attached a Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) tag, but I couldn’t find anything that did a simple scan of Bluetooth devices in range.

I turned to Google at that point, and decided to search for “locate lost fitbit bluetooth”.  The second item in the results was this blog post, which turned up a free app called BTLExplorer.  I installed it, ran it, and straight away it detected my Fitbit!

What followed was an ultra-modern version of “Marco Polo” or “Hot or Cold”.  I wandered around the house watching the indicated signal strength rising and falling, trying to get closer to where it was hiding.  Eventually, I found the room where the strength was intermittently rising above -60dBm, and sure enough, under a cushion, was my Fitbit One!

Now I can resume the monitoring of my activity levels.  In addition, my fruitless searching of the Apple App Store has made me realise that the App Store app on the iPhone is pretty useless for searching for apps: turns out there are a few other apps similar to BTLExplorer, but because I didn’t search for “bluetooth scanner” or “bluetooth explorer” I didn’t find them.

So far I’m pretty impressed with the Fitbit technology, even though it’s not that much more than a fancy pedometer.  While the device is pretty cool most of the intelligence of the system is in the app and the website, which analyse and interpret the data gathered by the device itself.  It is pretty nicely integrated: the device itself gets the movement data and syncs to the phone, which you can use to do basic display of the data while entering additional data like weight measurements and food and water consumption; the phone app syncs all that data to the website which does additional analysis and provides more of the social aspects of the system.

I’ll report back on how the Fitbit and its application environment helps me with my health transformation!